Direct Mail Strategy – Brand Identity Guru

1. Know your purpose: What do you want your direct mailer to accomplish? Do you want to be remembered? Do you want to educate prospects about benefits? Recently, Brand Identity Guru was hired to expand a clients direct mail efforts, so we created a direct mail piece to showcase our clients related capabilities. Now direct mail accounts for nearly 30% of our clients new business.

2. Research your market: Explore the companies on your mailing list so you can refer to their needs. Find out the top two issues and pain points that the company faces.

3. Be relevant: Your direct mailer should resemble something your client might use or buy.

4. Plan a campaign: The best direct mailers complement your PR, Advertising, Marketing Strategy and Sales efforts. Ultimately, each piece should build a cohesive, identifiable whole.

5. Attend to details: Find out the name of that purchasing agent or marketing contact and spell it right, proofread your words and double check visual placement. Even an award winning direct mailer is useless unless you send it to the right person at the right time.

6. Keep em’ coming: Send a series of direct mailers regularly based on your clients needs. To find out what those are, simply ask clients how often they’d like to hear from you. Generally, December is already crowded with mailings, so BIG suggests waiting until February. Bulk mailers are good monthly and targeted mailers quarterly.

7. Follow up: If you don’t follow up, all your efforts could slam to a halt. Initiate a dialogue with clients by making phone calls within a week or two after your mailing, especially if a client requests it. And of course, don’t waste time dialing hundreds of phone numbers, but know that it’s worth the effort for smaller mailings.

How Is Plastic In The Ocean Contaminating Your Seafood?

Scientists have studied how much of these pollutants are present in different types of seafood and what their impact on health could be, so that seafood processing companies can be aware when getting down fish from reliable seafood exporters in Sri Lanka.

Plastic is everywhere—in the air, water, and soil

Plastic pollution can be found everywhere we go, whether it is the ocean and other waterways, landfills, or even in the air we breathe. It is a problem that many nations are facing and seems to be getting worse as time goes on.

Plastic pollution in the ocean seems to be at its worst yet. With increasing amounts of litter, plastic bags and packaging are getting washed into the ocean. Without any type of degradation or decomposition happening to these plastics, they will float around for a very long time. Because there are no marine organisms that can degrade this type of pollution in water, it may be causing significant harm to many wildlife species as well as humans who consume seafood from areas where plastic has accumulated over time.

The effects on human health have been studied by scientists looking at how different types of seafood may be contaminated with the plastics that can be found in the oceans. One of the most common types is found in mussels, which can be ingested by humans. Other marine life may also become contaminated with these plastics, and there are concerns that this could affect human health as well if they consume them over time.

The plastic that ends up in the ocean breaks down into smaller pieces that get eaten by fish.

As mentioned earlier, the plastic found in the oceans gets broken down into smaller pieces over time. This means that it will more than likely get consumed by wildlife at some point, leading to a number of different conditions developing for both people and their food sources, depending on where they live along coastlines all around the world. These impacts could potentially create major issues further down the line for many who rely heavily on eating seafood every day, especially those living near coastal areas.

Fish are then caught by fish processing companies and fish export companies in Sri Lanka, for food and sold to grocery stores or restaurants. This same fish (or seafood in general) is then caught for food and sold to grocery stores or restaurants. This means that when we buy seafood, we are also buying the poison that has been ingested by the animals, and we, in turn, ingest it as well. This is a major problem for many people who want to eat seafood without the risk of being poisoned by their food source, but at this point, it’s out of our hands.

When you eat seafood that has ingested plastic particles, it can lead to gastrointestinal problems like diarrhoea or vomiting.

The negative health effects of eating such contaminated food include:

Diarrhoea
Vomiting
Intestinal problems
Nausea and/or vomiting
Increase in Cancer Risk: This is a major concern as people who eat seafood have a higher chance of developing certain forms of cancer, such as colon or breast cancer, much more quickly than those that don’t ingest polluted food sources. Contamination with chemicals like BPA has been found to be carcinogenic (cancer-causing).
Reproductive Issues: These issues include everything from birth defects to endometriosis and even infertility.

It’s estimated that over 90% of seabirds have ingested some form of plastic debris. It is not only the fish and marine life in the oceans that are being affected by plastic pollution; the soil and the air are also being affected by this pollution. Many types of seabirds have also been found to have plastic in their stomachs. These birds consume the food source without knowing that it contains polluted material, and this can affect them more than we think.

In addition, marine life is dying on a daily basis because they get trapped in plastic and get strangled or suffocated.

The solution

Reducing plastic pollution is a responsibility we all share to save the environment, our oceans, our wildlife, and one of our most popular food sources. There are several small changes that each of us can make in order to reduce this negative impact, including:

Invest in reusable water bottles instead of using disposable plastic.
If you drink coffee, invest in a travel mug and carry that around rather than getting one to go every single day.
Stop using straws with your beverages; we don’t really need them anyway.
Try not to buy plastic food containers. Instead, try investing in other storage solutions such as glass or metal ones like Tupperware, which are much more sustainable and less harmful to our environment.

Avoid using microbeads since they are made from plastic too—another thing we should stop doing immediately. Finally, make sure any other products you buy aren’t over packaged and try to avoid unnecessary excess plastic.

These kinds of small changes will make an incredible difference on our planet and help us decrease ocean pollution little by little. We’re not going to achieve it overnight, but if we keep trying every day, eventually these bad habits will stop being so frequent.

Weaving Logic Throughout Your Seminar Marketing Funnel

Effectively marketing a seminar usually involves the use of several promotional tools. To generate the best return on your marketing investment, it’s important to ensure that the pieces work together logically. If you are lucky enough to hook a prospective seminar attendee’s attention, you want to do everything possible to ensure that you don’t confuse and lose them.

For example, I was online the other night, researching which of my client’s competitors are running ads on Google AdWords. The more ads I clicked on, the happier I got. Although there were plenty of other companies competing for the same prospects, most of my client’s competitors dropped the ball once they won the click. They took their visitors to a web page that had absolutely nothing to do with what was advertised in their Google ad. At best, they directed visitors to a home page, where prospective customers could find the information they were seeking – IF they looked hard enough.

Unfortunately, this is a common problem in marketing. If you’re making this mistake, you are not achieving the maximum return on your marketing investment – guaranteed. Worse yet, you’re probably generating a lot of ill will among prospective customers.

As you compile your seminar marketing promotions and lead generation materials, make sure you continue the “conversation” you’re having with prospective customers from one piece to the next. For example:

If you’re running ads on Google, make sure the landing page to which you direct traffic delivers the information (and ONLY the information) that was promised in the ad. If you offer a free mini-course, the landing page should contain an opt-in form your visitors can use to subscribe to the mini-course.
If you ask visitors to opt in for a free report at your website, make sure the very next page they see after hitting the “submit” button is a page that thanks them for requesting the report — not a salesletter pitching your signature product. Alternatively, drive the report subscribers to your salesletter, but mention the report at the beginning of your letter and have a logical explanation for why you are sharing information about your signature product instead of delivering the report instantly.
If you send a postcard asking prospects to call a 24/7 recorded message to order a report, make sure the message mentions the report by name and reminds callers of the same benefits you highlighted in the postcard.
If you are promoting your seminar – in an ad, a postcard, a flier, an article, etc. – make sure that the URL you list in the promotion takes prospects directly to the page where they can find details about your event. Don’t drop them off at your home page and hoping they click their way to your event page.
Your goal in marketing is to win more customers — not to annoy and confuse prospects. Ensuring that there’s a logical thread of conversation throughout your marketing pieces will go a long way to cementing relationships and boosting sales.